Argh (busy busy)

Sorry for the lack of updates; things have been hectic around TiP Central due to various IRL issues.  Ideally I would be talking about a few odds and ends from 2013, including the various Lovecraftian RPG podcasts, my favorite releases from the year, etc.

Instead, for now I’ll just pass along a link to Golden Goblin’s latest Kickstarter for their next book “Tales of the Crescent City”.  They’ve already reached twice their initial target.  Check it out.

So many podcasts (and a few books)

Still working on my year-end-wrap-up but I didn’t want to miss out on the post-holidays batch of podcasts and new books and other news

Miskatonic University Podcast
They’ve had two episodes since I last mentioned them:
A long (long long) interview with Adam Scott Glancy and a not quite as long (but still substantial) interview with Kenneth Hite.

The Good Friends of Jackson Elias, slowing their pace down, talked about combat in 7th Ed. Call of Cthulhu and their favorite ‘weird’ movies.

Finally, the second part of the new Plot Points podcast’s discussion of Convergence is also out.

As for RPG stuff…
Secrets of Tibet is now available in print and Dead Lights as a PDF. If you have two grand (or were part of the Kickstarter) you can have a look at the proof of Horror on the Orient Express.

The Unspeakable Oath released the subscriber rewards – fiction from Adam Scott Glancy and John Tynes.

Oscar Rios has announced that the Kickstarter for Golden Goblin Press’ next book “Tales of the Crescent City” will start on January 24th.

And I tied for second in the most recent Shotgun Scenario contest on the Delta Green Mailing List.

There may be more, but I can’t think of it right now.

What a year (part 3)

And we roll on…

Chaosium
The Phantom of Wilson’s Creek (print version) {Monograph}

Haven’t read it. Sorry.

Atomic Age Cthulhu

I might not have an overwhelming urge to run a game set in the 1950s, but I think this book makes a strong case for that era as a setting for Call of Cthulhu. Of the scenarios, I think my favorite is L.A. Diabolical; they are definitely better than the recent Chaosium average.

The House of R’lyeh

I read one of the scenarios before release (and saw another when it was in Different Worlds #37) but I’ve not read the whole book. Terrible title, since R’lyeh doesn’t feature into any of the scenarios.

Missed Dues and Other Tales {Monograph; sold only at GenCon}

I wasn’t at GenCon, so I don’t have a copy.

Dark Crusade {Monograph}

Perfectly serviceable introduction to the Crusader States for non-historians. I may have read most of the source material in Grad school, but I suspect I’m not the norm in this. It was nice to see some additional material for Cthulhu Dark Ages since, to be frank, there is more action in the Levant than back in 1000 AD Europe. I do wish there had been a scenario.

Canis Mysterium

I reviewed this one already.

Horror Stories from the Red Room {Monograph}

Don’t have it.

Secrets of Tibet {PDF}

Ordered but it has not yet arrived.

Dead Light {PDF}

Not a classic, but an interesting scenario.

Horror on the Orient Express, ver. 2.0 {PDF, proof copy only; Kickstarter backers only}

I was excited to get my backer link and have a peak at the 2nd edition. I’ve not read it from cover to cover… there’s been a lot to read lately… but I was happy with what I saw. I do miss some of the character illustrations (some of my favorites in any CoC book) though, and I cannot get behind releasing 7th edition books before the damn 7th edition rule book comes out.

All in all, that was a lot of books for Chaosium. I really hope they’ve turned a corner, having had two very successful Kickstarter campaigns and appointed Mike Mason to head the Call of Cthulhu line.

Tomorrow – a few more comments, since I can’t stop blabbing.

What a year (part 2)

Continuing on…

Innsmouth House Press
The Masks of Nyarlathotep Companion {PDF}

I edited all of and wrote much of this titanic project. Hopefully I will be able to announce a print version soon.

Miskatonic River Press
Tales of the Sleepless City

MRP’s swan song (not counting the delayed “Punktown”), Tales was bittersweet; a great book but one that marked the end of a publisher. Unlike the forgettable scenarios included with Secrets of New York, it managed to wed the Cthulhu Mythos to its New York setting in a way that would no doubt driven Lovecraft from Brooklyn even faster. If you are running Masks of Nyarlathotep or want a change of pace from remote places or rural New England, give this book a look.

Modiphius
The Trellborg Monstrosities {PDF}
Achtung Cthulhu: Keeper’s Guide to the Secret War {PDF}
Achtung Cthulhu: Investigator’s Guide to the Secret War {PDF}

As per my comments about World War Cthulhu yesterday, while I’m very glad that Modiphius has had great success, this series simply didn’t capture my imagination. Perhaps some day I’ll pick up a copy and be swayed.

Pelgrane Press
The Final Revelation

I’ve read (and enjoyed) all but the framing scenario when they were published previously, but I wanted to have a reading copy so I can keep my limited edition Dragonmeet copies up on the shelf. I should probably read that framing scenario…

Eternal Lies {PDF}

Time for another confession… I can’t get into this. There is something so clinical about most Trail of Cthulhu scenarios that they simply are not, unlike Call of Cthulhu ones, fun to read. It’s like reading a grocery list merged with a horror story. Maybe it was the overall plot (which reviewers have appropriately avoided spoiling and I will do likewise) but I’ve still not finished it despite making a couple attempts. I should read it since it is Trail’s first campaign and I’m curious to see how they handle an on-going game.

Sentinel Hill Press
The Arkham Gazette #0 (PDF)
The Arkham Gazette #1 (PDF)

Wrote and edited most of these two. Give them a read!

Sixtystone Press
Lost in the Lights (PDF only)

An interesting, well-written and attractively presented modern scenario. Wondering why it still hasn’t come out in print.

Investigator Weapons, Vol. 1 (Classic era)

Essential for any Classic era game. Hans knows his stuff but this isn’t a dry catalog of weapon stats and damage tables. This presents weapons as historical artifacts that enriches your game, not just adds nifty kill machines, by giving you the context to the weapon and a deeper understanding of how they function. If you’re like me and aren’t someone with a lot of experience with weapons (reading that polearm table in Unearthed Arcana counts as experience, yes?) this is fascinating.

Solace Games
Fungi Mine (PDF)

I tend not to read PDF-only release. I may pick this up at some point, but I am in no rush.

Tomorrow, Chaosium and perhaps additional comments.

What a year (part 1)

By great Nodens beard I’m beat, but, dear reader, I feel obliged to start my year-end wrap up before 2014 is too long in the tooth.

First off, I want to thank every one for the kind words regarding Oliver, on and off-line.

Secondly, in looking back at the past year in Lovecraftian gaming, I realize how much of it I haven’t had either the time or inclination to read. This is, in a way, a good thing, since it suggests just how much material was produced for Call of Cthulhu and related systems. I hope no one is too put out that I am not going to give a comprehensive review to every release.

Let’s get started!

Arc Dream Publishing
The Unspeakable Oath #22
The Unspeakable Oath #23

I’ve written for the Unspeakable Oath, so I’m far from unbiased, but I look forward to every issue. The Oath put out two issues this year, which is a pretty good pace. Hopefully now that they’ve had a successful subscription drive they’ll have the resources to do even more in the future. My only criticism is that, as much as I liked “Cold Dead Hand”, Adam Scott Glancy’s Soviet scenario in issue #23, I would rather it have been a stand-alone publication rather than 75% of one issue of the magazine. I want more Oath.

The Sense of the Sleight of Hand Man

I realized yesterday that I hadn’t actually finished reading the campaign (I got distracted around page 200), so I can’t say I’ve read the whole thing, BUT I think this is a great book. It’s a unique campaign, only the second ever set in the Dreamlands (after Kevin Ross’ neglected “The Dreaming Stone”). It is a fresh approach to the setting that I think should disabuse Dreamlands detractors of their disdain. It can seem a little railroaded, but I think most players will enjoy the ride so much, they won’t notice.

Cubicle 7
Folklore (print version)

It was nice to finally see this in print. Not essential, but an enjoyable addition to my collection, especially useful to those running games set in the UK or using Celtic myths and legends.

World War Cthulhu

Confession time… I haven’t read this and I’m not likely to pick it up any time soon. WWII just isn’t a gaming setting that piques my interest. It sounds as if the Cubicle 7 version is less pulpy than Modiphius’ Achtung! Cthulhu, but if I’m using the War, I think I’d go even darker.

Golden Goblin Press
Island of Ignorance

Last for today, but most certainly not least, is Golden Goblin Press’ first foray. A really solid scenario collection with a couple outstanding pieces, Island of Ignorance is an impressive debut from this fledgling publisher. My own tastes would have replaced the supplemental articles with scenarios but I respect Oscar Rios’ desire to emulate the CoC Companions of old. GGP also ran the best Kickstarter I’ve yet seen – on time and with very open lines of communication. Let’s hope they keep up the good work, which I very much think they will.

That’s enough for now – next time, the rest of the books

Oliver

Sorry for the lack of updates of late. While I love gaming, sometimes other things are more important, and so the blog as taken a back seat to various issues. This is not a personal blog and I’m generally reluctant to post things here unrelated to the world of Lovecraftian gaming, but I wanted to take a moment to talk about something wholly different, our cat Oliver. If you don’t want to read the short obituary of a cat, don’t read on.

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