Lovecraft Country graveyards, Tulpa-talk, and more from the MUP

What’s been going on of late you ask? I can report the following:

There’s been a new episode of the Miskatonic University podcast – this time the MUPers talk about The Men of Leng, Cthulhu Dark Ages, their GenCon plans and more.

People following the supposedly-inspired-by-Slenderman stabbing in Wisconsin from a few months back will do well to listen to the latest episode of Monster Talk. They present some interesting information tracing the notion of the supposedly Tibetan concept of the Tulpa back to the Theosophists. Curse you Blavatsky!!!
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Over on the Sentinel Hill Press blog I’ve posted a preview of one of the project I’ve been working on – Graveyards of Lovecraft Country, covering Namacknowatt Island’s Sand Hill Burying Ground, a location I developed with Keith Herber for an as-of-yet unpublished scenario.

Finally, a few scenario reviews – King of Scabs (a now no-longer available online scenario) and the new Cthulhu Dark scenario He Who Laughs Last.

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Holding pattern

Not much to report on the ‘Tomes’ front recently; waiting for my print copies of The Unspeakable Oath #21 to arrive, waiting for news from Chaoisum about the Masks of Nyarlathotep Companion (and watching their Kickstarter hit $75k), waiting for my copy of Bumps in the Night to arrive, waiting for any news from the various books I’ve had a hand in, waiting for Arc Dream to post audio from their Delta Green session at GenCon, waiting for my daughter to start sleeping regularly again (thanks teething!), waiting for any of my regular podcasts to release a new episode… lots of waiting.  I suppose we can blame August?

In the mean time, I have, very nicely, been gifted a copy of Cthulhu by Gaslight, which, 34 pages in, I am enjoying greatly.  I’m also doing research for some Lovecraft Country projects (when I’m not tinkering about their edges), added some content to my LC graveyards book (3000 words so far), and went to take better pictures at a local cemetery.  Unfortunately I forgot what time of day it was, leaving me with the sun in the wrong position relative the stones, so they were damned hard to photograph clearly.  Next time I won’t forget my mirror.

Hopefully I will stop waiting for something from the above list soon…

Graveyard book(s) musings

MJMedwick asks:

[[“At this point I’ve not found an interested publisher (and don’t want to go the monograph route), so I might self publish as a PDF, look at other licensees, etc. I’m curious what my readership (all 6 of you) think about such a book.”]]

I can’t speak authoritatively for the commercial viability of the book if it is going to be geared specifically to the CoC community. Certainly there will be interested rpg enthusiasts out there — myself included — but I don’t know if you will recoup your investment of time and capital if that’s important to you. On the other hand, there ARE presses interested in just this “local interest” sort of thing (I can think of Rutgers University’s books on New Jersey history, for example) that might be able to market it to a more generalized audience if you’re willing to go that route. The fact that you’re doing the research, fieldwork and taking photographs might go some way towards engaging a small press that specializes in local history.

If it is to be principally a labor of love rather than a commercial venture, I’d say go ahead with it. I, for one, would be a customer.

I guess I should clarify.  I’m working on two parallel projects, one a visitor’s guide to graveyards (at the present time limited to Worcester County, Mass), the other an RPG project covering graveyards (and funeral practices, gravestones, etc.) focused on Lovecraft Country.  The later would literally be a monograph, tightly focused on a single topic in depth, but I would rather hold onto some control of the book rather than sell it to Chaosium for $250.  I’m not sure how I’d like to proceed with this project, but I figured I could float a trial balloon here.

The other book, the non-RPG one, would hopefully be of interest to local historians.  Someone published a similar book for Cape Cod and the Islands in the early 1980s; hopefully a similar project would be of some interest.

Grave(yard) news

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Entrance sign; I had to pull out a few weeds to make it semi-legible.

Two things today- news of a project I’m considering developing and a few photos from a graveyard. First the project: I’m considering writing a Keeper’s Guide to Graveyards (particularly those of Lovecraft Country). It would cover topics like history, layout, gravestones and symbols, maintenance and upkeep, and perhaps funerary practices. It would also give expanded notes about the various graveyards in Lovecraft Country, from the Old Wooded Graveyard in Arkham to Dunwich’s pickled Bishops as well as Mythos beasties and cults that frequent our burial places. At this point I’ve not found an interested publisher (and don’t want to go the monograph route), so I might self publish as a PDF, look at other licensees, etc. I’m curious what my readership (all 6 of you) think about such a book. I’d rather not post about it to Yog-sothoth.com until it is a little more concrete.

After the break, my visit to Spring Hill Cemetery…

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